Sequoia Unit Backcountry Horsemen of California

Gentle with Stock,

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Land and Trail

Mail: webmaster@bchc-sequoia.org?subject=Inquiry from the Sequoia Unit web page

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Backcountry Horsemen - Sequoia Unit

P.O. BOX 456, Springville, California 93265




Hope to see ya on the trail!

BCHC & Sequoia Unit History

The Backcountry Horsemen of California (BCHC) Sequoia Unit is located in Tulare County at the western gateway of the Golden Trout Wilderness, Inyo National Forest, Sequoia National Forest, Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Park. Our region of the southern Sierra Nevada Mountains includes Mount Whitney at 14,505 feet (4,421 m), the highest summit in the contiguous United States.

Tulare County is about half in the valley and half Sierra Nevada Mountains, with many riders interested in protecting and preserving the backcountry of our region. Our county goes from the valley floor major agricultural region climbing toward Mount Whitney, the highest peak in the continental USA. This mountain region is just south of Yosemite National Park and includes numerous other National Parks, National Forests and Wilderness Areas. Perhaps the most widely recognized would be Sequoia National Park and the Golden Trout Wilderness Area.

The High Sierra Unit of the Backcountry Horsemen of California was formed, based in Visalia, dedicated to the vast region. In fall of 1995 members of the High Sierra Unit living in the more southern areas of Tulare County met in the Martin Memorial Building of Springville to organize a new unit of BCHC. These members felt that a unit dedicated to a smaller geographic area would be more active in the affairs of the BCHC, members would be more likely to attend meetings on a regular basis, and better service could be provided for their more local backcountry areas.

There are two primary access roads into the mountains in the county, and the new Sequoia Unit would focus on the southern access while High Sierra would retain the northern access. With the blessing of High Sierra President at that time, Richard Cochran, the new Sequoia Unit was born in November of 1995 and interim officers were elected.

One of the founding members of the Sequoia Unit of BCHC was Charlie Morgan (see his memorial page) ... also known as Mr. Backcountry Horseman of California since he was also one of the founders of BCHC after being very active in the original HSSUA. Many people contributed to the conception, leadership and growth of the original Sequoia Unit. Since then, many members and officers from the Sequoia Unit have gone on to serve in various roles in statewide leadership as BCHC officers or have been active in committee work.

In addition to the member pack trips, day rides, and other family events, the Sequoia Unit continues the BCHC tradition of participating in Volunteer projects in the Forests and Parks of the area. The Unit is also active in Public Lands issues. Members attend various meetings, participate in discussion at various levels, provide written information and opinions, and share new information with other members and the public. There are times when the actions of the Sequoia Unit has made a difference!

A group of private and commercial packers met in 1981 to form the High Sierra Stock Users Association (HSSUA) with the purpose of representing horsemen in dealings with the administrators of public lands. Five years later the HSSUA joined with Montana, Idaho, and Washington to form an affiliation called the Back Country Horsemen of America.

The national organization's task is to coordinate activities of the various state backcountry organizations. The BCHA now has BCH organizations in 12 western states. The HSSUA adopted the name Backcountry Horsemen of California (BCHC) in order to conform to the national name and to better reflect its growing statewide membership. The association has a membership that totals over 4,000 men and women, most of whom are affiliated with one of our 25+ units.

Sequoia Unit History

BCHC History

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